Goodbye Nursing Homes!

We already know all of this! And consider ourselves the lucky ones!

Senior cohousing neighborhoods were actually created in Denmark in the early 1960s and brought to North America in 1988. Due to the boomer generation looking for more desirable alternative living arrangements, cohousing has been growing in popularity and has picked up steam in recent years.

A cohousing community is intended to ensure that each senior that lives there can enjoy privacy and have a space of their own (their own house or apartment) while also being able to take advantage of shared spaces.

Essentially, it’s seniors living in their own space, surrounded by THEIR friends who share things like the dining area, library, fitness center, garden, TV room, and more — how exciting!

#seniorcohousing

https://theheartysoul.com/co-housing-seniors/

Borrowing Strengthens Society

The amount of social capital being created and exchanged is a great barometer of a community’s health! Examples of items recently shared by neighbors at Phoenix Commons include: umbrellas, batteries, books, dogs, movies, kitchen gadgets, sweatshirts, rides, and yes, even the occasional cup of sugar!

#cohousing #WeLoveToShare

https://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/dirt/community-relationships-borrowing-from-neighbors-strengthens-democracy-20190318

Elixir For Aging

Supportive friendly neighbors right outside your door? Check.

Sharing of resources, knowledge, and responsibilities? Check.

All the community you want with all the privacy you need? Check.

For aging boomers who understand that personal independence can be maximized through social interdependence, senior cohousing communities are an extremely attractive option.

Cohousing Does Not Equal Commune

Join us for a dinner or party in our common areas and you’ll quickly realize that cohousing is NOT just for hippies!

PS. But hippies are welcome here too — we are just a few miles away from Berkeley after all!

#cohousing #someofusarehippies

Community-Focused Living Spaces

It’s not exactly cohousing, but the apartments described in this article are part of a growing trend of living spaces designed with community in mind — a trend we at Phoenix Commons are proud to be pioneering!

https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-coliving-development-20190106-story.html

The Antidote to Loneliness

The San Francisco Chronicle wrote a great article about our PC community. We think we’ve found the antidote to aging as well. Life is always buzzing around here, keeping us active and excited!

https://www.sfchronicle.com/business/networth/article/Senior-cohousing-an-antidote-to-the-13510258.php

“Hygge” and the Danish Roots of Cohousing

If you browse around Denmark’s official tourism website, you may come across an article on the art of hygge. The word (pronounced ‘hooga’) may seem strange to American ears, but the concept of hygge is very familiar to anyone who has ever spent time in a cohousing community, and certainly to the members of Phoenix Commons. It is roughly translated as ‘coziness’, but as the website explains, it’s actually more than that:

In essence, hygge means creating a warm atmosphere and enjoying the good things in life with good people. The warm glow of candlelight is hygge. Friends and family – that’s hygge too. There’s nothing more hygge than sitting round a table, discussing the big and small things in life. (VisitDenmark.com)

So hygge is basically the cozy feeling one gets from sharing good food and conversation with a supportive, trustworthy group of folks. This feeling can be found around the world, wherever lives are bonded tightly together through the habitual breaking of bread and meeting of minds. At our members’ gatherings, hygge frequently manifests itself as laughter, people doing nice things for each other, and time flying by much faster than usual. That’s a lot of meaning packed into a single 5-letter word!

still-life-379858_640

Join now and lock in current Phoenix Commons pricing

Phoenix Commons, our new senior co-housing community being built on the Oakland/Alameda waterfront, is offering core group members the opportunity to lock-in the current pricing for those people who join the community by Friday, August 1, 2014.
Due to increasing construction costs, prices will be going up about 5 percent as of Saturday, August 2nd.  Updated price listings will be offered to members who join on or after August 2nd.
Becoming a Phoenix Commons owner is a three-step process, beginning with joining as a member of the core group (the $500 membership includes a position in the selection queue, meeting attendance, Successful Aging course and financial qualification.),  The next steps will be Unit Reservation Deposit ($3,000 which reserves your selected home unit and applies toward the 20% Final Deposit, which is step 3).
home-5Please call the Phoenix Commons office at 510-217-8527 or contact us at info@PhoenixCommons.com for more information and to join now.

Senior Cohousing: A Financially Sustainable Third Way

Some rather startling results emerged from a recent survey of older adults:

  • 70% of Baby Boomers are unaware that the costs of long-term care are NOT covered by either Obamacare or Medicare
  • Affluent Boomers expect their long-term care to cost $36,220 annually, while the actual cost of such care is expected to rise to $265,000 annually by 2030, a gap of over $200,000/year between expected and actual costs
  • 71% of Boomers want to receive long-term care in their own homes

Combined with the fact that 43% of the 55+ crowd has less than $25,000 saved for retirement, it’s quite clear that we are not prepared as a society for the enormous task of taking care of our seniors in the years ahead. The article mentions aging in place as a preferred option, but few homes are adequately constructed for the special needs of seniors, not to mention the resulting social isolation that can destroy one’s health as severely as any physical disease.

Yet there is an alternative to aging in either an institutional setting or alone in a big, empty home. This third way, enormously popular in Scandinavia and now just starting to gain a foothold in the U.S., is to age in an intentional community. The benefits for older adults of having a solid social support system nearby have been documented in numerous studies, yet continue to be underestimated by most traditional retirement planners.

Senior cohousers are not immune from the natural aging process, but the daily adventures that are possible with their neighbors make them a more vivacious and optimistic bunch than your typical group of seniors. By tapping into and sharing their own knowledge and skills, cohousers can enjoy a wide variety of services and experiences at much lower cost than they would in an institutional, consumer-driven model. It may not keep you out of the nursing home forever, but senior cohousing can prolong the active stage of your elderhood and help you conserve your financial resources in the process.